Top 50 Best Reviewed Hardside Luggage - Buyers Guide 2018


We have read and checked 67,902 reviews reviews to make this top 50 list!

Most hardside luggage is of great quality, but unfortunatly there are also some bags that aren't worth considering.

It therefore pays to spend some time checking the many brands and models, so you can make sure you choose a quality bag that fits your needs.

To help you choose, we have read and checked 67,902 reviews to find the best reviewed hardside luggage.

Check out the top 50 list below.

How we rate the bags

We have checked thousands of reviews, so we can show you the weighted average rating of all the bags.

Using the average ratings, you can check what all the reviewers think instead of just viewing the subjective opinion of one specific reviewer.

It's much simplier to find the best bags that way.

Top 50 hardside luggage 2018


Brics Capri luggage
Brics logo
5.0
9 reviews

Gabbiano Provence luggage
Gabbiano Provence
Price range $$

5.0
10 reviews

Skyway Nimbus luggage
Skyway Nimbus
Price range $$$
Skyway logo
4.8
16 reviews

Anne Klein Manchester luggage
Anne Klein Manchester
Price range $$$

4.8
26 reviews

Lojel Rando luggage

4.8
12 reviews

American Tourister Disney luggage
American tourister logo
4.7
933 reviews

Titan X2 luggage
Titan X2
Price range $$$
Titan logo
4.7
30 reviews

No photo
Ricardo beverly hills logo
4.6
84 reviews

Ben Sherman Nottingham luggage

4.6
21 reviews

Timberland Boscawen luggage
Timberland Boscawen
Price range $$$

4.6
156 reviews

Kenneth Cole Reaction Reverb luggage
Kenneth cole reaction logo
4.5
470 reviews

Samsonite Inova luggage
Samsonite Inova
Price range $$$
Samsonite logo
4.5
178 reviews

Kenneth Cole Reaction Out of Bounds luggage
Kenneth cole reaction logo
4.5
9,049 reviews

Travelpro Maxlite luggage
Travelpro Maxlite
Price range $$
Travelpro logo
4.5
4,078 reviews

Samsonite Silhouette luggage
Samsonite logo
4.5
791 reviews

Samsonite Black Label luggage
Samsonite logo
4.5
4 reviews

Delsey Helium luggage
Delsey Helium
3 bag types available.
Price range $$
Delsey logo
4.5
3,181 reviews

Andiamo Pantera luggage
Andiamo Pantera
Price range $$$

4.5
22 reviews

Travelers Choice Tasmania luggage
Travelers choice logo
4.5
1,287 reviews

Samsonite Omni luggage
Samsonite Omni
Price range $$$
Samsonite logo
4.5
4,670 reviews

Delsey Chatelet luggage
Delsey Chatelet
2 bag types available.
Capacity 112.7 l (6875 cuin)
Price range $$$
Delsey logo
4.4
138 reviews

Rockland Melbourne luggage
Rockland Melbourne
Price range $$
Rockland logo
4.4
15,507 reviews

Travelers Choice Sedona luggage
Travelers choice logo
4.4
2,358 reviews

No photo
Rockland logo
4.4
8,638 reviews

Travelpro Crew luggage
Travelpro Crew
3 bag types available.
Capacity 48-136 l (2929-8299 cuin)
Price range $$$
Travelpro logo
4.4
1,455 reviews

Goplus Globalway
Goplus Globalway
Price range $$

4.3
1,320 reviews

Victorinox Spectra luggage
Victorinox Spectra
Capacity 70-90 l (4272-5492 cuin)
Price range $$$
Victorinox logo
4.3
314 reviews

Samsonite Winfield luggage
Samsonite Winfield
Price range $$
Samsonite logo
4.3
3,524 reviews

Gabbiano Genova luggage
Gabbiano Genova
Price range $$$

4.3
22 reviews

Delsey Cruise luggage
Delsey Cruise
Price range $$
Delsey logo
4.3
144 reviews

Nautica Ahoy luggage
Nautica Ahoy
Price range $$

4.3
1,452 reviews

Briggs & Riley Sympatico luggage
Briggs & Riley Sympatico
2 bag types available.
Price range $$$$
Briggs & riley logo
4.3
209 reviews

Brics Bellagio luggage
Brics Bellagio
Price range $$$
Brics logo
4.2
45 reviews

Samsonite Cruisair luggage
Samsonite Cruisair
Price range $$$
Samsonite logo
4.2
294 reviews

Heritage Lincoln luggage
Heritage Lincoln
Price range $$

4.2
191 reviews

Travelers Choice Toronto luggage
Travelers choice logo
4.1
445 reviews

Travelers Choice Freedom luggage
Travelers choice logo
4.1
257 reviews

Zero Halliburton Air luggage

4.1
7 reviews

Hartmann Vigor luggage

4.1
28 reviews

Perry Ellis Traction luggage
Perry Ellis Traction
Price range $$
Perry ellis logo
4.1
44 reviews

Merax Travelhouse luggage
Merax Travelhouse
Price range $$
Merax logo
4.1
4,121 reviews

Lojel Lucid luggage
Lojel Lucid
Price range $$$

4.0
156 reviews

Travelers Club Chicago luggage
Travelers club logo
4.0
1,226 reviews

Samsonite S
Samsonite S'cure
Price range $$$
Samsonite logo
4.0
188 reviews

American Flyer Fireworks luggage
American flyer logo
4.0
85 reviews

Samsonite LIFTwo luggage
Samsonite LIFTwo
Price range $$
Samsonite logo
3.9
228 reviews

Briggs & Riley Torq luggage
Briggs & Riley Torq
Price range $$$$
Briggs & riley logo
3.8
308 reviews

Delsey Bastille luggage
Delsey Bastille
Price range $$$
Delsey logo
3.8
82 reviews

Perry Ellis Forte luggage
Perry Ellis Forte
Price range $
Perry ellis logo
3.7
56 reviews

Heys Xcase luggage
Heys Xcase
Price range $$$
Heys logo
3.6
32 reviews

Rimowa Topas luggage
Rimowa Topas
Price range $$$$$
Rimowa logo

Samsonite Firelite luggage
Samsonite logo

Rimowa Salsa luggage
Rimowa Salsa
Price range $$$$
Rimowa logo



Review Summary

67,902 reviews of bags checked.

Average rating is 4.4 out of 5.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
65%
20%
5%
4%
6%



Top 10 hardside luggage brands

The 10 highest rated hardside luggage brands based on the 67,902 reviews we have checked + the highest rated bag from each brand.

BrandAverage ratingTop hardside luggage
Skyway4.8Skyway Nimbus
Anne Klein4.8Anne Klein Manchester
Titan4.7Titan X2
American Tourister4.7American Tourister Disney
Ricardo Beverly Hills4.6Ricardo Beverly Hills Roxbury
Ben Sherman4.6Ben Sherman Nottingham
Timberland4.6Timberland Boscawen
Kenneth Cole Reaction4.5Kenneth Cole Reaction Reverb
Gabbiano4.5Gabbiano Provence
Andiamo4.5Andiamo Pantera



Related Ranking Lists



Choosing luggage, particularly pieces that you have to take on an airplane can be quite tricky. There is just so much that you have to take into account to find the right option. Hardside luggage, especially, requires you to consider quite a lot before you make a purchase. After all, you are trying to make an investment.

If you don’t want to end up with a white elephant case on your hands, you need to be able to understand how to choose a piece of hardside luggage. To make this process a little easier for you, we have decided to create an article that shows you everything that you need to do. Here is all of the information that you should be aware of.

Hardside Luggage: What You Need to Know About the Buying Process (Buyers Guide)

Hardside luggage is a relatively new type of suitcase and isn’t as prominent among travelers. So, when it actually comes time to make a decision, you may not find that you have all that much information to go on. This can make it difficult to know whether you are choosing the right piece of luggage for yourself. Well, if you want a little bit more help in this department, you have come to the right place. Here is what you need to know:

Hard vs. Soft Luggage

When it comes to luggage, the first decision that you will have to make is between hard shell luggage and soft shell cases. As the name suggests, hardside luggage comes with a tough shell while soft shell suitcases are often made from fabric. Now, these two types of luggage have their own set of advantages and disadvantages so let’s take a look at what each of them has to offer:

Soft Shell Luggage

You are probably quite familiar with soft shell luggage as they still tend to be one of the more commonly used options. The reason that people tend to go for this type of luggage is because it is easier to pack more items into it. Since there is less rigidity to the exterior, you can also stuff in a few extra things. This flexibility also means that it is easier to fit the smaller versions of these cases into the overhead compartments in planes. The downside, of course, is that neither the case nor the things inside are afforded all that much protection. Also, the higher quality soft shell bags tend to be quite heavy as well.

Hard Shell Luggage

The main benefit of hard shell cases is that the outer part of the luggage is incredibly strong. It is meant to be able to withstand being dropped and mishandled. The materials ensure that the suitcase stays intact and that the items inside are also well protected. Surprisingly enough, hard shell cases are actually quite light due to the way that they are built. So, although they may not look like it, they can actually rival soft cases when it comes to weight.

Which One is Better?

It actually isn’t a case of which one is better but rather, which one is right for you. One of the reasons that hardside luggage is becoming more popular is because of its durability and longer lifespan. Also, with weight restrictions becoming stricter and more expensive with airlines, these type of suitcases actually help you to stay in check when packing.

What Is Hardside Luggage Made Of?

Hardside luggage is actually made of several materials. The materials that are used depend on the manufacturer as well as what the main purpose of the bag is. For instance, a case that is meant to be durable may be made from a different material than one that needs to be lightweight.

The most commonly used materials are hi-tech plastics. These include polycarbonate, ABS plastic, and polypropylene. If your main goal is to minimize the amount of weight of the luggage, then you should opt for ABS which is the lightest of all of these options. Of course, while it is strong it may also not afford you the same level of protection as the other materials.

Polycarbonate is a bit heavier than hardside luggage made from ABS plastic. The upside to this is that polycarbonate is also stronger. So, you can expect your suitcase to be able to take a bit more battering around and still be virtually unscathed.

If you want a suitcase that is tough yet flexible, you should look for ones that are made from polypropylene. Cases made from this type of material are quite hardy and much more capable of protecting the items inside your suitcase. Despite this, these suitcases are actually quite light.

Now, a hard shell material that it isn’t mentioned too often is aluminum. Luggage that is made from aluminum tends to be quite pricey, not to mention rather heavy as well. The payoff to these downsides is that these cases are practically indestructible – well at the hands of impatient airport baggage handlers, at least. They also happen to be nearly impossible to break into due to the special lock system on such suitcases.

Sizes of Hardside Luggage

There is quite a bit of variation associated with hardside luggage sizes and capacities so you should be able to find one that is best suited to you. Here is a guide:

Carry-on Luggage

This refers to hardside cases that you can take aboard an aircraft and store in the overhead compartment above your seat. For these type of bags, you have to be careful about the size as well as the weight that you are carrying. As a rule of thumb, a bag that has dimensions greater than 22 x 15 x 9 cannot be considered as carry-on luggage.

Checked Luggage

With checked luggage, you have a little bit more freedom when it comes to size and weight. This does, of course, differ from airline to airline. It is typical to find that any bag that exceeds linear inches (length x width x height altogether) 62 inches will be considered excess luggage. For cases that are bigger than this, you may be expected to pay an additional fee.

Taking Weight Into Consideration

Along with the size, you will also need to think about how much each piece of hardside luggage weighs. As mentioned, airlines will restrict how much you can carry onboard as well as check in as baggage. The more that your hardside case weighs, the less that you will be able to pack into it due to these limitations.

Internal Storage Organization Features

Hardside cases don’t have exterior pockets or compartments of any kind. So, you have to rely on the internal capacity of the case to store all items. This is why you should look for as many organization features as you can. This can usually be divided into mesh pockets, small pouches, straps, and even dividers.

The main purpose of such features is to help you to separate various items from one another so that it is easier to locate when the case is opened. Of course, they can serve another purpose too. There may be instances in when you do not fill up the luggage to full capacity. In this case, you will need to ensure that all of the items are secured so that they don’t move around during the journey.

Expansion Feature

In many cases, hardside luggage is built to allow only a certain amount of items and will can’t fit any more than that. However, there are certain designs that do give you the chance to expand your luggage so that it can carry even more items. This is often managed by additional length of fabric with a separate zipper attached. The average hardside suitcase can expand anywhere from an inch to almost five inches. As you can imagine, making use of this feature does mean that you will be carrying more weight as well.

The Wheeling Options

These days, you will be hard-pressed to find hardside luggage that doesn’t come with wheels attached at the bottom. These fixtures certainly make it easier for you to transport your luggage from one place to another. While you may not think that the wheels on your suitcase are all that important, you should pay closer attention to them.

The first thing you will need to do is to figure out if you want a suitcase that has only two wheels at the bottom or four. It is now becoming more common to see hardside cases with four wheels as these do make it simpler for you to maneuver through tight spots. The four wheels – also known as spinners – can move in a 360° direction which makes it easier for you to turn the suitcase and pull it in this manner.

Still, two wheels can still come in quite handy. There are often good on more uneven surfaces and are better equipped to handle a variety of environments. At the same time, since you need to bear some of the weight of the luggage, it can be a bit tiresome to keep handling this type of luggage.

In most instances, the wheels on hardside luggage tend to be more exposed and don’t have the protection of the luggage frame. This is why it is quite important to check that the wheels are durable and will not break easily. This doesn’t mean that the wheels should be made from a harder material, though. A more flexible material will work better as it is less likely to crack against rocks or other hard obstacles. On a similar note, you should stick with larger wheels as well. These are less likely to get stuck in ruts or small spaces and will handle more smoothly.

More Food for Thought – Square vs. Round Edges

Hardside luggage will either have square edges on its frame or round edges. While this may seem like a stylistic feature, it is actually a functional one. The round edges on a suitcases means that it is less like to get scratched or become damage and withstands wear and tear quite well. On the other hand, the square edged suitcases have the benefit of allowing you more internal storage space. So, it is up to you to decide whether you want durability or space when examining the corners of a suitcase.

This is what you need to be aware of when choosing any and all types of hardside luggage.


Last updated on May 26, 2018

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