Camelbak Octane XCT Review, Pros and Cons

Camelbak Octane XCT is rated 4.22 based on 172 reviews


Feature Summary


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CamelBak Octane XCT Hydration Pack, 70oz
  • Ventilated waist belt with cargo pockets for easy access to essentials
  • Reflectivity for early morning or evening runs
  • Front-facing pockets on harness for easy fuel and gear storage
  • Made with ultralight materials
  • The brand new Crux delivers 20% more water per sip, with an ergonomic handle for easier refilling, and an on/off lever that makes it easy to prevent leaks.


Reviews Summary


Here’s what the reviewers think about the Camelbak Octane XCT:

Reviewers like these things about the Camelbak Octane XCT

  • Reviewers found out that the Camelbak Octane’s Crux delivers more water per sip.
  • Users thought that its reflectivity for early morning or evening runs is helpful.
  • Reviewers indicated that it has an ergonomic handle for easy refilling and an on/off lever to prevent leaks.
  • Others noted that the bag was made with ultralight materials.
  • Testers said that it has front-facing pockets on a harness for easy fuel and gear storage.
  • Other users thought that the tube trap holds their bite valve in place between sips.
  • Many reviewers found that it features leak-proof on/off valves.
  • According to some reviewers, the cap is redesigned for easier refilling and seals shut in just a few twists.

Reviewers don’t like these things

  • A reviewer had issues with the size of the bag.
  • Another reviewer mentioned that the bladder is challenging to fill.

Selected Reviews


Bike Radar

The unpadded back means hard objects can sometimes stick through if you don’t arrange them properly, but it keeps weight very low and means the pack stays close and stable in more mental moments. Wicking fabric across the back, deep wing sections and broad straps also remained remarkably dry and comfortable, even in 110F desert heat.

Posted 30 November 2010 by Guy Kesteven – Read full review


Utah Outside

Overall, I’d say the Camelbak Octane LR may be a game-changer for anyone into mountain biking, trail running and adventure racing. I’d even be interested to see how the pack would work for skiing and snowboarding at resorts.

Posted 15 October 2010 by Jared Hargrave – Read full review


Bike Radar

This is a lightweight, high-comfort winner that combines excellent design with a high-quality bladder.

Posted 27 September 2010 by Russ Burton – Read full review


Bike Radar

Great value lightweight essentials-and-water pack, but high ?t won’t suit all. The only potential downside is that it needs to ride high and tight to stop it flopping all over the place, so if you’re into a loose and low bag fit, it’s not for you.

Posted 7 August 2009 by Guy Kesteven – Read full review


Bike Radar

The Octane’s single big main pocket has an expansion zip down the back panel so you can run it thin for short rides or full bore to swallow spare layers, pads and coats.

Posted 17 May 2009 by Guy Kesteven – Read full review


Bike Radar

This medium-sized hydration backpack from the original drinking system company has useful expandable capacity and external pockets, and is rock-solid stable. Detail fans might like a bit more help with organisation and it could do with a bigger bladder as standard.

Posted 1 January 2008 by John Stevenson – Read full review


Bike Radar

A light duty Camelbak that has all the functionality of its sturdier siblings but a fraction of the weight.

Posted 1 January 2007 by Matt Skinner – Read full review



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Last update on 2018-12-15 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

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